Temperature vs. Exercise…

Does exercising in a low temperature produce less soreness and a speedier metabolism? In contrast, does high heat make muscles more pliable? “Brrrn”, the sound of your teeth chattering, is a studio in Manhattan that keeps its temperature at 50 degrees Fahrenheit.  “Bikram” yoga studios can have their thermostat set at 95 with humidity at 75 percent. Since the body temperature naturally rises during exercise, extreme heat can make it rise beyond what the body’s natural cooling system can handle. On the contrary, sustained exercise in heat can make you perform better in the cold. Extreme cold can leave the body susceptible to hypothermia, but colder temperatures can enable you to exercise longer giving some athletes the edge. Sports medicine practitioners feel that extremes of temperature can make the body feel as if it is doing more work. The general consensus among athletes is a comfort level of between 68 and 70 degrees although it varies from person to person.  This is the temperature of most fitness centers. Colder weather can be better for athletic performance since it protects the body from overheating and dehydration. Warmer temperatures increase motivation to exercise. There is more of a positive psychological connection to being outside in addition to the fact that it takes less time for our muscles to relax. Warm temperatures expose us to more Vitamin D which improves muscle function and growth. Learn to be in tune with your body. Find at what degree you exercise most comfortably and go for it!