Tea-Time…

The earliest records of coffee date back to the 9th century but drinking tea can be traced back as far as 2737 BC. China is by far the largest consumer of tea with 1.6 billion tons brewed annually. Other countries where there is a considerable amount of tea consumed are Turkey, Ireland and The United Kingdom. Tea is the most sipped beverage after water. According to the Friedman School of Nutritional Science and Tufts University, tea drinkers consume antioxidants which may be a deterrent against cancer, heart disease, osteoporosis and memory decline. Drinking tea without milk has been found to be more beneficial. Black tea may help strengthen bones. According to a five-year Japanese study of 498 women, those who drank black tea had higher bone density in the lumbar spine region as well as the hips.  Green tea contains the plant compound epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG). Some studies have found that it may decrease LDL cholesterol as well as reduce inflammation in the body. White tea contains catechins a compound that may keep blood vessels open and possibly break down fat. If you are able to handle caffeine 2 or 3 cups a day is recommended. I myself am a coffee drinker and will only have a cup of tea when I am severely ill but if you enjoy tea just make sure it is good quality.