Should we Squat more?

Do we spend more hours lounging than our ancestors the hunter gatherers? Actually, we don’t, so what is different about how we spend our off hours that makes us more vulnerable to sickness? It seems that although our ancestors spent only a few hours hunting and gathering foods their off hours were not spent in the sitting position. They would actually rest in a squatting position. In study after study it is becoming more obvious that it is sitting that is a major contributor to sickness and inflammation. In studying the Hadza tribe of Tanzania, scientists noted that although they are very active for a number of hours hunting and digging up tubers, they wondered if how they spent their down time was the reason why they were in such perfect health. In a study published by The National Academy of Sciences, scientists placed fitness trackers on tribespeople ranging from age 18 to 61. What they found was that they were inactive for almost 10 hours every day. This is equal to the population in the modern world. What they also found was that the Hadza spent their off hours either squatting or with knees bent and butt to the ground. As a result, tests showed that the activity in leg muscles remained constantly high. It is believed that sitting reduces the activity of certain enzymes that could possibly contribute to serious illnesses. Maybe we should look at our children and remind ourselves how easy it was to take a break by simply squatting.