Anchovies and Sardines…

Both small fish are usually packed in tins, are affordable and are a great source of Omega 3 fatty acids which are deficient in the American diet. Omega 3’s are anti-inflammatory which can counterbalance the overload of Omega 6’s in our diet (inflammatory fatty acids). Zingerman’s a mail order company out of Michigan stocks over 70 types of tinned fish. Some are even aged. Sardines have a wide appeal to a wide range of people. They were a traditional meal of the coastal American Indians before the arrival of the Europeans. Anchovies are great added to sauces to bring out an unusual additional zing. Few know that they are usually present in Worcestershire sauce, steak sauces and in Caesar salad dressing. To top things off, sardines and anchovies are the lowest on the food chain which means they contain little, or no mercury as do larger fish such as tuna, swordfish, halibut etc. My favorite way of eating sardines is by first sautéing onions, adding dried cranberries and after a few minutes adding a can of sardines. Another favorite is sautéing garlic and a few anchovies and pouring the sauce over steamed broccoli.

Living with Parkinson’s Disease…

Parkinson’s disease affects about 1 million Americans. Doctors describe it as a neurodegenerative disease in which the brain neurons begin to die. However, advances are making progress in slowing down the progression of the disease. High Intensity Cardio exercise can slow the progression of the disease. Clinical trials in 2018 showed treadmill workouts 3 times a week along with strength and balance training slowed the rigidity caused by Parkinson’s. Personalized genetic testing has made it possible for physicians to target specific genes with medication. Microbial bacteria are also being considered since many patients have been found to have an overabundance of H. Pylori in the gut which can also be attributed to self-medication with over-the-counter probiotics. Biomarker detection is being studied as to the possible signs and markers of developing the disease. Although it is uncurable, these measures give hope that a patient’s life will not be totally devastated by the disease.

 

https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamaneurology/article-abstract/2664948

Trauma and Weight Training…

For years Psychologists have recommended exercise for mental health. Now it seems mental health groups are recommending formalized weightlifting routines as a therapeutic tool for those who have experienced both physical and psychological trauma. Physical trainers are being educated on how to deal with this special category. Why is it that lifting heavy things helps people with trauma recover? Research is finding that the resistance of weight training has a connection to building resilience. There is now a certification for any practitioner who wishes to become a special trainer for clients dealing with trauma. Yet people who have experienced some sort of emotional trauma may avoid exercise because it may raise heart rate, breathing, and body temperature-all symptoms which they feel may bring on anxiety. A beneficial system of weight training will include periods of rest in which the person is allowed to check in with themselves to see how they are feeling so as not to be overwhelmed. This gives the nervous system a chance to settle down, so it can absorb more stress as the sessions continue. Hope is that these people will feel more comfortable in their body and have a stronger mind-body connection.

 

You Need a Good Squat…

Squats are touted as one of the best exercises by most exercise scientists. It may seem like a lower body exercise but in fact you are targeting the whole body. Squats improve core strength, flexibility, and balance. It is one of the top exercises used for rehabilitation. Some people fear that you may be doing damage to the joints involved but in fact squats can actually strengthen your tendons, muscles and bones.  Most of our everyday chores involve squatting whether it be picking up a toddler, getting out of a chair, or gardening. Squats can improve athletic performance and prevent the injuries which may occur from any sport. If you have neglected to practice squatting, use the back of a chair to balance yourself. After which you can move on to free squatting and if you a not feeling it is enough of a challenge, grab a light barbell in front of your chest for extra weight. Don’t be intimidated! Slow constant motions with good form even if it is only a few at the beginning can be extremely rewarding. Always consult your physician if you are doubtful of your ability to safely perform a squat.

 

http://medcraveonline.com/MOJYPT/MOJYPT-03-00042.pdf

https://www.webmd.com/fitness-exercise/health-benefits-of-squats