Tracking your Water Intake…

 

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                One of the most significant factors in maintaining a healthy weight or any weight loss program is water consumption. Most cravings for sweets, originate from dehydration. Drinking cold water can actually create a thermogenic effect on the body. In one experiment with 14 men and women, drinking 500ml of water increased metabolic rate by 30%. This happened within 10 minutes and lasted for up to 30-40 minutes. The water must be cold. Cold water creates the thermogenic effect when the body attempts to warm the water. However, lining up glasses of cold water as a reminder to drink can become problematic especially if you are away from home. A simple method might be to put 5 rubber bands around your wrist first thing in the morning. Every time you drink a bottle of water place one of the bands around the bottle and refill it. Make it a daily game.

 

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/14671205/

https://academic.oup.com/jcem/article/88/12/6015/2661518

Robots working in the O.R.

Replacing a joint has become so matter of fact. Baby boomers especially don’t think twice about replacing a knee, hip etc. if it means extending the amount of time that they are able to stay active. The first joint replacement, according to historians, was in 1890. It was a carved and machined piece of ivory which replaced the knee of a seventeen year-old. It was performed, by a German surgeon named Themistocles Gluck. Over the years, the material used has changed dramatically. Everything from metal, plastic, ceramics to titanium. In the decade, 1990-2000, new technology made plastics more durable. This eliminated wear and tear and eventual replacement of the joint again. Technology has progressed to the point where you enter an operating room and there may be a model of a bone implant superimposed on a 3-D model of the person’s joint. Robotic arms which are directed through a console are guided and controlled by the surgeon. The tiny robotic hands are able to bend and rotate with a greater range of motion. This enables the surgeon to operate by only making small incisions preserving more bone and soft tissue than a conventional open procedure. Less muscle damage translates to faster recovery. Greater accuracy can mean better alignment and balance after knee surgery and minimal leg difference after hip surgery. This also preserves the longevity of the replaced joint. Hopefully we will never replace the surgeon totally.

https://www.intuitive.com/en-us/about-us/company?gclid=EAIaIQobChMI9LKyvP_k7gIVjeSzCh318QIcEAAYAyAAEgIRz_D_BwE

https://www.davincisurgery.com/?gclid=EAIaIQobChMI9Pm0tv7k7gIVByCGCh3b8QMbEAAYAiAAEgKhpPD_BwE

Workouts may slow Tumor Growth…

The American College of Sports Medicine reviewed past research on how exercise can reduce the risk of developing some cancers by as much as 69%. The data also showed how exercise can improve treatment outcomes which in turn can prolong life. One line of thought is that exercise can lower inflammation in the body and therefore cultivate an environment that is less friendly to malignancies. In a new study performed at Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, scientists inoculated two groups of rodents with cancer cells. One group was allowed to be extremely active while the other remained sedentary. They noted that in the group that was active there was very little evidence of tumor growth.  The T cell (immune fighter) that they attributed this to is the CD8+ T cell. What they also discovered was when they suppressed this particular T cell, regardless of how much activity, tumor cell growth was no longer suppressed. They then isolated and injected the CD8+ t cell from active rodents into sedentary rodents and found that their tumor growth was suppressed. After removing blood from the active rodents, they determined that their blood contained a large amount of lactate produced from exercise. Bathing T cells in lactate produced stronger cancer fighting T cells. There appears to be a profound effect that exercise has on the ability of the T cells to suppress tumor growth and how these cells remain persistent in fighting cancer over a period of time.

 

https://www.cancer.org/latest-news/exercise-linked-with-lower-risk-of-13-types-of-cancer.html

An Extra Set of Salivary Glands…

The human body is so complicated. After years of cutting and dicing cadavers, we are still finding hidden unknown organs. Scientists in the Netherlands have discovered a fourth set of salivary glands hidden inside the nasal cavity. Until recently it was believed that there were only three major sets. Why is this important? Salivary glands are responsible for supplying spit. In turn, the mouth becomes lubricated allowing us to both speak and swallow. They help us fight off germs from entering the mouth and have great healing powers for infections in the mouth. Most important they help with tasting our food which is a major contributor to quality of life. The tissues that comprise these glands are extremely delicate, and doctors are extremely careful not to destroy them when using radiation. These two hidden glands may be a major funneling system for transporting fluid from the head to the base of the tongue. The new finding may help to answer the question why people who undergo radiation of the head and neck so often end up with so many of the effects of injured salivary glands. Since they were so well hidden, doctors, unaware of their existence, never took precautions to spare them. It is not clear at present if these glands exist in the whole population or in certain groups of people. The research needs to widen its study to include a more diverse population. It just goes to show what an incredible piece of anatomy our bodies are.

 

https://www.beckershospitalreview.com/quality/physicians-may-have-discovered-4th-pair-of-salivary-glands-in-head.html