Whole vs. Low-Fat Milk…

Data was collected on 2,745 children by Canadian researchers. The children selected milk-cowswere between ages 1 to 5 and a main factor was their height and weight. They collected blood samples and information on whether the children drank 1%, 2% or whole milk. The conclusion of the experiment was that the children who drank whole milk had a higher Vitamin D level and that the body mass index (B.M.I.) of these children was lower. The results were published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. Although the reason is not yet clear, it has been suggested that Vitamin D is better absorbed with a higher content of fat which is found in whole milk. On the other hand, low-fat may leave a child hungrier for other foods that are much more calorie dense.