Compression Sleeves…

Compression sleeves and garments may help recovery after strenuous exercise.compression-sleeves They augment the movement of blood flow through muscles after exercise when it would have otherwise slowed down. This can help flush out lactic acid, a by-product of a heavy workout, in turn reducing inflammation and muscle aches. The downside is that they must be worn for several hours after exercise and since they are tight can become uncomfortable for some.
                                     

Vitamin D and Asthma…

sunshine_vit-dAccording to an analysis published by The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Vitamin D may lower the risk and severity of asthma attacks. The study involved 435 children and 658 adults most of whom had some degree of asthma. 400 to 4000 units of the supplement reduced symptoms in 37% of the participants. Severe attacks requiring emergency intervention decreased by 60%. There is the possibility that vitamin D triggers antiviral and anti-inflammatory responses which decrease the risk of lung infection. Of course before you add any supplement to your regiment you should speak to your doctor first. However, taking a little dose of vitamin D from the sun can’t hurt.

Teff…

Great for endurance and contains a healthy vegetarian source of iron, Teff originated some 3,000 years ago in Ethiopia. North Africans consume about 15% of their diet from this teffgrain. It is the size of a poppy seed and provides slow burning energy especially for runners. Iron deficiency is especially high among female runners and Incorporating Teff into a diet may be the solution. This ancient whole grain has been showing up in pastas, protein bars and pancake mixes. It also has a high protein content and can be eaten by people who are gluten intolerant. Try substituting it for a hot cereal in the morning.

I Just Can’t Sit Still…

Toe-tapping, foot wagging, constantly clicking your pen, moving back and forth in fidgeting-handsyour chair are all viewed as nervous tendencies.  Some of us find being in the presence of people who fidget annoying and even uncomfortable. But is there any benefit to these constant, unconscious movements?  Most people spend a good part of the day seated. Meetings, classrooms, lengthy assignments take up at least 8 hours of our day. During these hours our legs hardly move, in fact, physically most of our body is not doing much of anything. Does this lack of blood flow throughout the body have consequences? During extended periodsfidgeting-desk of little movement, there is no need for our blood vessels to remain flexible. How can we combat this? What if you are faced with situations where it is impossible to work while standing or even taking a short walk? Is fidgeting the body’s response for the need to encourage blood flow? Testing of blood flow on limbs that were subject to movement as well as stationary, showed simple fidgeting proved to have greater blood flow as well as arterial function which resulted in a normal fidgeting-headstandrange of blood pressure. There is a growing school of thought that fidgeting actually stimulates an improved level of attention which may be a better approach to teaching children with ADD, instead of attempting to have them sit still. There is even a connection made of how the brain may become more invested in a task if it is accompanied by even the simplest act of fidgeting. So sit sideways, tap your feet to the rhythm you hear in your brain, or simply alternate crossing your legs. If someone around you finds it irritating, simply say that you have scientific evidence to back up the benefits of your actions. If that doesn’t attract their interest, try the fact that you are also burning calories.