Coconut Husks and Sustainability…

Coconut husk clothing “Cocona” is a trademarked name for a lightweight, breathable sports wear fabric derived from coconut-husk waste. It is proven to be warm, water and odor resistant. Of the 50 billion coconuts grown worldwide annually, 85% of the coconut husks end up as trash. “Essentials Materials” a Texas based company has succeeded in transforming this waste product into automotive truck liners, planters and battery covers for electric cars. The process is accomplished by combining the husks with discarded recycled plastics.

 

 

Natural Dye Garden…

In New York City at the Fashion Institute of Technology a “Natural Dye Garden” hasFlowers for dying opened. It is a project run by the students and was given the support and a grant by the Clinton Global Initiative University. The aim of the garden is to bring awareness and alternatives to the harsh chemicals used in the dying process of fabric. All of the colors are derived from flowers, herbs and vegetables.

Digital Printing…

digital dressDigital Printing is a technology that is gaining ground in the fashion industry. It is the process whereby prints are applied to fabric by printers. Digital printing reduces water waste by 95%, energy usage by 75% and saves on fabric waste. This is possible since set up fees are low, smaller lots can be printed and prints can be made to fit an exact measurement. 
 

Recycled Fibers…

A young British company “Worn Again” is testing a way to separate precious fibers from clothing oldcolors and chemicals so as to be able to recycle these fibers. Clothing is collected, processed and made back into yarn. We now use 65 million tons of cotton and polyester a year and that is expected to increase to 90 million by the year 2020. If this process is successful it could mean a great deal towards reducing textile waste. 

Fake Fur, a sustainable fiber…

Fake furStella McCartney, fashion designer and daughter of Paul McCartney, has been a lifelong vegetarian and a pioneer in non leather shoes and bags. She has now gone a step further by answering the fur craze with fake fur that looks so much like the real thing. All the garments being made are so authentic looking that a special band on the wrist or nape of the neck will read “Fur Free Fur” to make it perfectly clear to the customer that no animal was used in the making of the garment.

Linen Flax…

Linen is made from flax, another traditional fiber crop which needs few chemical fertilizersLinen dress and less pesticides than cotton. Less chemicals and pesticides protect our waterways. It is biodegradable and can be grown in cold climates as well as off season. Because it is recyclable it can later be made into paper and used as insulation in the auto industry. Besides being extremely strong the older it gets the more comfortable and cooler in warm climates it becomes.

Bamboo Fabric…

The softness of bamboo has been compared to the feeling of cashmere. It is highly sustainableBamboo Stalks because its vast, fast growing root system does not require replanting after harvesting. Its complicated root system is also beneficial in that it prevents soil erosion. There are two ways to produce this fabric, one is mechanically and the other is chemically. The mechanical way is far superior. Bamboo is broken down into mush using natural enzymes and then spun into fabric. The chemical way is much quicker but involves using toxic chemicals that have been linked to nerve damage. When checking labels make sure the product is environmentally friendly.  Some reputable labels are Oeko-Tek, Soil Association, SKAL, KRAV or any brand that is certified organic and sustainable.

Hemp…A Sustainable Fabric

  There seems to be confusion as to whether hemp for clothing, oil, food etc. is grown from the same hemp3plant as that which is smoked. There is a difference. There are different variants of the plant. The high amount of psychoactive drug compounds in the plants that are used commercially is extremely low. However just connection to the word “Cannabis ” has made it illegal to grow here in the states. This is not so in other countries where the fabric made from hemp is considered extremely environmentally friendly. It has no need to be grown using pesticides or insecticides and is drought resistant while improving soil conditions. It is not necessary to use toxic chemicals or sophisticated technology when fabric is produced from its stalks. Hemp has been used for thousands of years and is great for local economies as well as being a great sustainable fabric.

New product from the Fabric world…

suede   Mushroom Fabric: 

One of the newest fabrics being introduced to the luxury market is apparel derived from microbes. To be more specific the root system of mushrooms. Biocouture, founded by  Suzanne Lee, has woven a fabric so thin and flexible that it resembles suede.suede roots They are now looking into bacteria, yeast and algae as other sources of sustainable production from nature. Sounds a little strange? What about silk made from silkworm excretions.