Let Sleeping Dogs Lie…

Posted by Lenny Variano on September 29, 2020

Research is showing that sleeping in the same room with your dog whether your pet is sharing the bed or just lying on the floor, is proving to be beneficial to our health. According to recent poles from dog owners 50% regard their pet as a member of the household and they no longer relegate him or her to a doghouse. In a study performed at the Mayo Clinic of Phoenix, 40 dogs and their masters participated. To monitor activity the dogs wore a Fit-bark and the Humans wore an Anti-watch 2. After 7 days they discovered that both the dogs and their owners slept soundly. Sleep efficiency of between 80 and 85% were recorded for both which is a high number for determining a good night’s sleep. It is possibly due to the fact that most people develop a sense of security with a dog somewhere near. For those who live alone the closeness can reduce loneliness which often leads to depression. Most owners slept better when the dog slept beside the bed as opposed to on it. However, this might not be a great idea if the dog is a puppy or if there is also a new baby in the room. Don’t get me wrong. I am not saying you should get a new pair of PJ’s for Fido but if he is insisting on lying next to your bed it may be a healthy move to consider.

 

https://www.cesarsway.com/sleep-with-dogs/

https://thebark.com/content/13-scientific-benefits-sleeping-your-dog

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3 Myths about Brain Health…

Posted by Lenny Variano on August 29, 2020

  • We use only 10% of our brain.  If this were true, brain injuries would not be so devastating. In fact, brain scans show that a good portion of the brain is used for even the simplest tasks.
  • We are dominated by either your left or your right brain.  It is true that most people receive language skills from the left part of the brain and experience special and emotional abilities from the right. However, Brain scanning technologies have shown that both hemispheres work together when it comes to complex processing.
  • We have only five senses.  Along with our sense of touch, smell, sight, hearing and taste we possess much more. Proprioception is our relation to where our body parts are and what they are doing. Nociception is our ability to feel pain. Thermoception enables us to sense temperature changes. Chronoception allows us to sense the passage of time. Interoception provides us with awareness of our internal needs such as hunger and thirst.
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Art of El Anatsui…

Posted by Lenny Variano on August 29, 2020

His art resembles the plate armor of soldiers in medieval Europe and Japan. At the same time, it has the effect of a fluttering piece of fabric. Born in Ghana, his work is developed from a unique way of joining small pieces of metal. All of his pieces are composed of what would be discarded metal whether it be cans, lids or caps. Pieces take thousands of hours to produce and besides the impact they have on protecting the environment, give work to countless Nigerians in the production of a piece.  His work consists of flattening strips of metal, cutting them into hexagons and then connecting them together with pieces of wire. All of his pieces are created while maintaining the original names of the products they were recycled from. They can be as large as 16 feet and will never appear in the same manner depending on how they are hung. The draping of the metal is so fluid that no matter how they are hung they maintain their beauty. His work reflects the artist’s concern for our present-day environmental crisis. If you ever have a chance to see a piece of his work, don’t hesitate.

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Islet Cell Transplant…

Posted by Lenny Variano on August 29, 2020

Islet cells are found in the pancreas. They are composed of alpha and beta cells. The beta cells are those that make insulin and help us properly use glucose for energy. With Type 1 diabetes the beta cells no longer make insulin. There is a new experimental treatment in which healthy beta cells from a donor are transplanted to a patient with Type 1 diabetes. The hope is, in the future, a person with Type 1 diabetes will be able to make their own insulin and not rely on taking daily injections. At present transplants are available in Canada, United Kingdom and Australia. This is still in the experimental stages in the US because of concerns about its effectiveness as well as the possibility of rejection. In a recent study performed by The National Institute of Diabetes, Digestive and Kidney Disease, 43 participants who had highly unmanageable Type 1 diabetes received the transplant. One year later 43% of the participants still did not need to take insulin. The new transplanted islet cells are infused into the bloodstream where they find their new home in the liver instead of the pancreas which decreases the possibility of complications. At present the cells last 3 to 5 years and the recipient must take immune suppressing drugs just like any donor recipient. It does however open the possibility of a more carefree life for a person who must be at all times aware of their blood sugar levels. These transplants are getting more and more refined.

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